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22/November/2019 Posted by Freddy

Top 5 : RPGs on the Gameboy Advance

        Welcome to this episode of RPGGamer Top 5s, and this time we're going to do the top 5 RPG's on the Gameboy Advance.
        The Game Boy Advance (commonly abbreviated as GBA) is a 32-bit handheld video game console developed, manufactured and marketed by Nintendo as the successor to the Game Boy Color. It was released in 2001 and was part of the sixth generation of video game consoles. The original model did not have an illuminated screen; Nintendo addressed that with the release of a redesigned model with a frontlit screen, the Game Boy Advance SP, in 2003. Another redesign, the Game Boy Micro, was released in 2005.
        Contrary to the previous Game Boy models, which were all following the "portrait" form factor of the original Game Boy (designed by Gunpei Yokoi), the Game Boy Advance was designed in a "landscape" form factor, putting the buttons to the sides of the device instead of below the screen.
        The system was based around a 16.8 MHz 32-bit ARM7TDMI with embedded memory, with a 8.4 or 4.2 MHz Sharp LR35902 (8080-derived)
coprocessor for Game Boy backward compatibility. The system had 32 kilobyte + 96 kilobyte VRAM (internal to the CPU), 256 kilobyte DRAM (outside the CPU) and had a display of 240 Γ— 160 pixels (3:2 aspect ratio).
When playing Game Boy or Game Boy Color games on the Game Boy Advance, the L and R buttons can be used to toggle between a stretched widescreen format (240Γ—144) and the original screen ratio of the Game Boy (160Γ—144). Game Boy games can be played using the same selectable color palettes as on the Game Boy Color.





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21/November/2019 Posted by Freddy

        A bunch of updates today, based on yesterdays review of Droids: Season 1 Episode 8: The Revenge of Kybo Ren. Today we've added Jessica Meade, Jyn Obah & Gir Kybo Ren-Cha to the Star Wars D/6 Characters Section, Sungwa to the Star Wars D/6 Creatures Section, Bogden to the Star Wars D/6 Planets & Places Section, and The Dianoga to the Star Wars D/6 Starships Section of the Site.

Freddy

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19/November/2019 Posted by Freddy

Star Wars Resistance: Season 2 Episode 7: The Relic Raiders

        Well after all the excitement of The Mandalorian last week, we've still got another ongoing Star Wars series, and we review the latest episode, Star Wars Resistance: Season 2 Episode 7: The Relic Raiders. The TLDR; review is, it's not very good, it's kind of back to the first season, and Kaz is behaving like a useless fool once again. Which is kind of sad given the progress which had been made this season, and especially sad given the hype I heard before seeing this episode about how good it was, and it wasn't.

Freddy

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19/November/2019 Posted by Freddy

        A smaller bunch of updates today, based on the subject of yesterdays review, Droids: Season 1 Episode 7: The Pirates of Tarnoonga. Today we've added the Miridon to the Star Wars D/6 Creatures Section, Mon Julpas command ship & Fuel transporter to the Star Wars D/6 Starships Section, and Tarnoonga to the Star Wars D/6 Planets Section of the Site.

Freddy

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18/November/2019 Posted by Freddy

Retro RPG: Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition Players Handbook

        The Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition Player's Handbook contains all the rules you need to create characters and begin adventuring with the world's most popular role-playing game. Newcomers to the game will appreciate this book's clear explanations, effective examples, pleasing layout, elegant rules, and brilliant art. It's never been easier to create and role-play a heroic human ranger, cunning elf wizard, or any other fantasy character from the game's 7 races and 11 classes.
        Old-school players will likewise be pleased, as the outdated AD&D rules system has been given a thorough overhaul. Gone are almost all the old restrictions on race and alignment. Halfling sorcerers, half-orc paladins, dwarf barbarians and gnome monks are now possible. THACO, negative armour class, funky saving throws, inflated ability scores, heat-based infravision and just about every other needlessly complex rule has been reworked into a faster, more consistent and fun system. Players can choose unique special abilities for their characters as they gain levels, which means that even two fighters of the same race and class can have very different abilities. The end result of all these changes is a dynamic game with more customised characters.
        Almost every page has some form of new artwork, and the art almost always serves to explain a concept or illustrate a point. The book is filled with example montages that help to show the difference between human, half-elf and elf, or relative size differences between creatures or what the various levels of cover and concealment look like. These illustrations make the rules much more clear. The style of the artwork is consistent throughout the book and is a definite departure from older editions of AD&D. Instead of the classic medieval artwork of Larry Elmore, the new book has the spiky, leathery, Mad Max-meets-Renaissance look of the Magic: The Gathering card game.
        The illustrative changes may be too radical a departure from AD&D tradition for some, but the other modifications are definite improvements. The rules are fast and clear, and the characters--including the new sorcerer class and the return of the monk, barbarian and half-orc--are fabulous. If you're new to the D&D game, then this rule book is the perfect introduction. And if you're an old-school gamer who's played D&D since its inception, then welcome to then new era.




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